How to Kill Flea Eggs – 7 Quick Methods

Getting rid of live fleas is one thing but if they have left behind a batch of eggs then the cycle will simply repeat.

Therefore, you will find yourself with a further flea infestation – like cat fleas. Killing flea eggs will solve the problem.

It is not uncommon for flea eggs to go unnoticed or to mistaken for other things such as dandruff or flecks of dust.

How To Spot A Flea Egg

It is important to be vigilant in order to stay on top of any possible flea infestations and the first point of call is to ensure that the flea eggs are dealt with.

Flea Eggs

But in order to do this, you must be able to recognize them. Let’s take a look at what you should be looking out for in the hunt for flea eggs.

  • Flea eggs can be either transparent or have a white tinge to them.
  • The eggs usually measure less than half a millimetre and so are very small.
  • Flea eggs tend to be oval in their shape.

As we mentioned, flea eggs can often be mistaken for other things including grains of sand and this is especially true of people who regularly take their pets to a beach or other sandy location.

If you are in any doubt that what you have discovered on your pet are flea eggs, you can always place the object under a magnifying glass to take a closer inspection.

Flea eggs are not the only sign that your pet may have some unwanted guests, and often times they are not the first thing that people notice when checking their pets for fleas, because of how they might resemble something else.

If you spot what you consider to be flea eggs, there are other signs to look out for which can determine whether or not your pet has a flea problem.

  • Excessive scratching, more so than is usual for your animal.
  • Live fleas present within the animals coat and on their skin.
  • Obvious flea bite which can leave a red mark on the skin of your pet.
  • Bites or irritation on your own skin.
  • Areas of thickened skin on your pet.
  • Flea dirt, which are essentially the waste product of the fleas and appears as small black flecks.
  • One way to determine if what you are seeing is flea dirt is to place the black specks onto some white tissue and add a drop of water, if it is flea dirt it will show a red tinge.
  • The flea dirt are the fecal matter from the fleas and so contain the blood that they have eaten from their hosts, this will be evident as the aforementioned red tinge.

How to Kill Flea Eggs – 7 Quick Methods

Now that you have established that your pet is suffering from a flea infestation, you are going to be asking how to kill flea eggs, and there are many ways in which you can do this.

It is important to remember that the eggs may well have transferred from your pet and onto other surfaces in the home, where they will continue to incubate until they hatch, then of course, if these eggs have not been treated, the fleas will reattach themselves to your pet and the process will begin all over again.

We are now going to look at some various ways in which you can get rid of the flea eggs as well as preventing them from reappearing in the future.

  • You can begin tackling the flea eggs by thoroughly cleaning your home. When doing this you must ensure that you are brutal in your approach. A simple whizz around with the vacuum cleaner will not be enough.
  • In the case of trying to kill flea eggs and prevent a further outbreak, you should make sure that you get into any cracks a crevices where the eggs may have landed and wipe down any surfaces where flea eggs could have landed.
  • Deep clean any bedding or other fabrics in the home such as sofas, cushion covers and throws. These should be washed on a hot wash if this is possible and for things that cannot be put into a washing machine, they should be vigorously scrubbed and vacuumed. This process should be done daily for a good period of time to ensure that absolutely no eggs remain.
  • Once you have cleaned the entire home, you can now use a flea repellent spray which can be sprayed all around the home and will assist in your battle against another infestation.
  • You can use the spray in nooks and crannies as well as using extra on areas where your pet spends a lot of time such as their bed.
  • You may decide to steam clean your carpets which is an excellent way to kill flea eggs hiding within the pile but it is important to remember that this will only tackle the areas which you can reach with it and so further cleaning will be required in those harder to reach areas.
  • If things are really bad, you may opt to use a flea bomb which will successfully kill any fleas and eggs which are within the home.
  • If you do decide to take this approach you should be very careful in making sure that no one is within the home at the time and this includes any plants or flowers, as the flea bomb will have a very negative effect on these too. It is also worth noting that you should cover your furniture to avoid the pesticide from getting onto it.
  • In order to avoid flea problems, you should treat your pet regularly with a flea treatment which can be brought from supermarkets, pharmacists and pet stores. This is the best way to prevent having issues with fleas.
  • Regularly comb through your pets fur with a special electric flea comb to make sure that any unwelcome visitors are spotted as early as possible, the sooner you spot them, the easier it will be to treat the problem.
  • Stay on top of the cleanliness in the home and make sure that you frequently wash your pets bedding as well as other fabrics in the home and ensure that vacuuming takes place at least daily.

  • If you have been using a vacuum to remove flea eggs, the contents should be discarded in an outside receptacle as soon as you have finished, this will prevent the flea eggs from returning back into the home.

Conclusion

Flea eggs are known to be difficult to remove but it can be done using the right methods.

It is not only important to know how to kill flea eggs but also essential that you are aware of how to avoid the problem in the first place, making like easier and more comfortable for you and your pet.

Resources

  1. https://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/general/fleas
  2. https://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/infectious-parasitic/what-do-flea-eggs-look-and-how-do-you-get-rid-them

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